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People who drive cars as main form of transport are four kilograms heavier than cyclists

Lee Baker
10 August 2016
What is involved in decisions to travel by bike and the consequences are being studied
What is involved in decisions to travel by bike and the consequences are being studied

 

Research involving 11,000 volunteers in seven European cities on travel behaviour suggests that regular car-drivers are four kilograms heavier than cyclists on average.

The EU-funded Physical Activity through Sustainable Transport Approaches (PASTA) project led by organisations including Imperial College London and the World Health Organisation is studying how different forms of transport relate to people's health. An analysis of the data so far provides some "intriguing" initial results, Imperial College reports, stressing that researchers cannot yet draw a causal link between transport choices and weight.

Dr Adrian Davis, a member of PASTA's advisory board, said the research was also indicating that factors such as urban design can play an important role in determining the level of people's physical activity. The project is still looking for volunteers in London and in six continental cities.

 

 
 
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